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      News — retro games

      WEEKLY DOSE OF GAMING NEWS: Immortal Ka, Boxx Remake, & Last Action Hero

      WEEKLY DOSE OF GAMING NEWS: Immortal Ka, Boxx Remake, & Last Action Hero

      As we enter December, we crank up the action as we wait for some nice seal-tight suggestions in the following weeks. There's no better way to kick off 2022’s last month than some ass-kicking. This time we're looking at a side scroller, a platformer, and a straight-up brawler. Perfect when it comes to satisfying every retro action connoisseur. We hope you came prepared because things are about to get wild!

       

      Immortal Ka

      We rarely get games that are both indie and completely new. Immortal Ka by Josyan checks both boxes. It's clearly an homage to Awesome 16-bit arcade Classics like Ghost and Goblins and even Super Big Karnak. So far, the game is just a prototype, but whatever's been finished is very much playable. The game follows your classic story from the olden times.

      The Gods have condemned all humans, so ancient Egypt finds itself corrupted. Now, thousands of evil creatures from the world of the Dead have come to tremendous. Maibe is a lonely hunter from the outskirts of Luxor who somehow gained some supernatural powers. She's the only one with a pure enough soul to save us. So it's up to you to make sure that she does.


      The game features, Egyptian-themed levels, nice aesthetics, and a complete arsenal of weapons to help you defeat all the mythological creatures that come your way. If you're into the myth boss love a bit of retro action and wanna save the world, then Immortal Ka is worth checking out.

       

      Boxx Remake

      Amiga owners and enjoyers can rejoice once more as we get another cool Home Brew installment. Back then, Lemming880 platformers Boxx 2 and Boxx 3 were released on the Amiga system. Both of these games were a ton of fun, as they required players to collect as many coins as possible, all while avoiding deadly traps, killing bad bosses, and aiming to reach the exit to complete each level.

      It was intense, for sure. Well, that's not exactly the news here. The spicy update comes in the form of Lemming880, releasing a full remake of the very first Boxx game. The Scorpion engine makes its ground return, giving the game updated graphics sound effects, And brand new coding based on the ongoing Boxx 4 project currently in development.

      It's nice to see all this come together and even nicer to know the Boxx remake is now available for download

       

      Last Action Hero


      The Amiga Live just released a hack of 1994 Amiga's Last Action Hero. So yes. Keep the Arnold Schwarzenegger memes coming. Earok dropped the surprisingly cool news saying “Amiga live did a hack of the Last Action Hero a while ago and I got permission to repost it here. It features a raft of gameplay balance tweaks to improve on the Notorious Film Tie-in”

      The particular hack is nice as it gives players who just discovered the game a smoother experience. We're talking about unlimited continues, more lives, a hundred percent health restoration, increased loop speed, and more

      While the movie wasn't the best one out there and the game back then didn't get much recognition, this little tweak in 2022 might just give it the cult following It deserves. Now, all we need is some really good voice acting.

       

      Check the video here:

      Subscribe to our YouTube for more Retro Gaming News!

      WEEKLY DOSE OF GAMING NEWS: Super Metal Hero, Tournament Arkanoid ZX, and Starfox EX

      WEEKLY DOSE OF GAMING NEWS: Super Metal Hero, Tournament Arkanoid ZX, and Starfox EX

      2022 brought its fair share of triple-A sequels and reboots, and it's no different when it comes to the retro side of things. Classics were made to be appreciated, and sometimes, reimagined. Thankfully, the retro dev community has enough passion to make all our dreams come true. We'll be taking a look at something new, something we thought was lost in time, and something we didn't think we needed until now. 

       


      First up, another surprise for all the Amiga owners and enjoyers out there. The ever-awesome Colin Vella is coding the much-awaited awaited kickass game Super Metal Hero In Blitz Basic.



      Working on graphics we got Tenshu and JMD is in charge of bringing the music to life. The development videos are live, and they're looking hot. The game has definitely come a long way since its first few times featured online. Not only has the dev team been optimizing it to work on a stock Amiga 1200, but the game also includes a new world, new levels, new backgrounds, new enemies, and a lot of firepowers. If you're into heavy artillery, and a whole lot of action, then Super Metal Hero just might be the game release you've been waiting for!

       


      Now, it's time for a blast from the past courtesy of a sweet mod for the ZX Spectrum, made by Martyn Carroll. We all remember Arkanoid, and it's about time it got something new. That comes in the form of Tournament Arkanoid, a tribute and callback to the classic.


      There's a lot of great artwork to go around, and Jarrod Bentley never disappoints. This mod comes in with a new loading screen crafter by Jarrod Bentley himself, and along with it, everything you've come to know and love about the original game. By that, we mean 32 levels of great difficulty, just like the arcades! It's a recreation of Taito’s official game from the old-school Tournament Arkanoid arcades. Since it was only available in 1987 in North America, it's nice to have it available on a larger scale in the modern 2020s. 

       


      So, this one's a bit of a different case. It's not a remake, a reboot, or a brand-new game. It's a ROM hack, but a cool one, if we're completely honest. It's for the classic arcade-style rail shooter Starfox and best believe we're doing a barrel roll into Starfox EX.


      What we get from this is a brand new story for the game and dozens of amazing features that take full advantage of the Super NES and the SuperFX chip We also get a brand new map with 17 new levels, new bosses, music, backgrounds enemies, a 3+ page pre-game menu to customize your experience, and a whole lot more. One of the best features is the Multi-Tap, which allows you to play the game a whole new way. It's straight-up old-school multiplayer, either with friends, Al-controlled teammates, or just you controlling ALL the ships. If you want a challenge, you got it. The 90s lives on, and always will, through games like this. Starfox EX opens the door to a variety of possibilities for so many other retro games-and let's be honest, we can't wait to see what comes next!

       

      Check the video here:

      Subscribe to our YouTube for more Retro Gaming News!

      What's the Gum Recipe? - Garbage Pail Kids: Mad Mike and the Quest for Stale Gum

      What's the Gum Recipe? - Garbage Pail Kids: Mad Mike and the Quest for Stale Gum

       

      Now, who doesn't love to chew gum? Here at Mega Cat Studios, we chew gum every chance we get. And we also had a chance to interview one of the developers of Garbage Pail Kids: Mad Mike and the Quest for Stale Gum, Tim Hartman, of Retrotainment Games, and here's how it went!

      How was this game born?

      The game was born out of our love for the Garbage Pail Kids and the Nintendo Entertainment System.

      As young kids in the '80s, Greg and I grew up fans of trading cards and various products that emerged as the GPK craze broke out. Garbage Pail Kids were loved by kids, hated by adults, and snubbed by the gaming industry in the NES era. They were controversial, which may have kept them out of the space. We like to say that we're creating the Garbage Pail Kids game they've long deserved.

       

      What was development like?

      The design process for this game flowed very well as our team loved the opportunity to work with Topps to bring their characters to life and felt natural to do so. It was a real treat to get deeper into the GPK lore since many of us on our team are lifelong fans and collectors.

      One of the main ideas was to bring as many GPK characters to life as possible; so we went through the cards, found ones we liked that we thought would work, and then brainstormed about what they could do in the game to make them unique and add variety. In the end, we were able to include 40+ characters.

      Developing for the NES is nothing but difficult though. You have to deal with the challenge of game development along with hardware restrictions, space constraints, and more. But this is what we love and what GPK deserved so we wanted to make it happen.

       

      What did you learn about yourself through this game?

      Personally, I learned that it was very difficult to make the tough choices of which characters to use and which characters not to use in the game. There are so many amazing characters in the GPK universe and it was super tough to narrow it down.

       

      What makes this game special?

      It's a legit game made for the original NES and directly ported to modern consoles like Nintendo Switch, Xbox, and Playstation. You get the same game regardless of where you’re playing it.

      Even though it is littered with GPK lore, characters, and fun, gross elements, it is however a game someone can pick up and play without being familiar with the Garbage Pail Kids. We designed it with the idea that every level has something new and surprising in it. It also has minigames, a trading-card mechanic, fun NPCs, and a silly story. Our audience is anyone who likes games. It's also cool to give people a chance to get their first new NES cart, which is something a lot of players have never experienced before.

       

      How does sound play a role in the game?

      A quirky and unique brand like Garbage Pail Kids deserves an equally goofy soundtrack that’s fun to listen to and a fun set of sound effects. Complete with burp and fart samples, the sound is definitely a highlight of the game.

       

      What games influenced this one the most?

      We started by making the game we wanted to play. It wasn't a case where we were looking at another game as a model or a direct inspiration.

       

      Any fun stories or wild moments during development?

      Getting to work with Adam F. Goldberg, Ira Friedman at Topps, iam8bit, Digital Eclipse, and Joe Simko was particularly fun, as we got to smash a ton of '80s nostalgia and love for the era into this goofy project.

      The wildest moment for me personally was when I was having a meeting with Ira Friedman, and my son threw up during it. I quickly yelled out Up Chuck (a character in the game) while Ira assured me it was a Luke Puke.

      I still laugh about this every time I think about it.

       

      Do you think preserving older gameplay mechanics in new games is important?

      Yes, but I think it is healthy to have both new and fresh mechanics whenever possible when developing. Old mechanics are tried and true, being very familiar to players, but taking a chance on fresh mechanics can really help create a new experience. For example, Leaky Lindsay and Luke Puke both have projectile attacks but Lindsay’s snot rockets are the classic straight-ahead shots while Luke’s projectile vomiting follows an arching path. This allows for some unique combat with Luke because you can hold B to get more distance, rain the attack down onto enemies below or leave a pile of puke in front of an enemy and wait for them to step in it and take damage.

       

      What's your favorite memory as a gamer?

      My favorite memory as a gamer is playing Baseball Stars for the NES with friends like my business partner Greg Caldwell. Creating our own leagues and teams, playing full seasons, keeping stats, throwing controllers, and getting into fights over gameplay is something I will cherish forever.

       

      Who will enjoy this game the most?

      Garbage Pail Kids: Mad Mike and the Quest for Stale Gum is for old kids like us and young kids like our children. We think the older crowd who grew up with the Garbage Pail Kids will have a great time with it. It's fun and silly and gross -- which makes it great for younger kids as well. Ultimately, it's for people who want to experience a retro game, whether this is their first time experiencing an 8-bit game or they've been playing NES since they bought one new.

      Retro gamers will enjoy this the most, but I feel modern gamers who give it a chance will be quite surprised by the various hero characters and their unique offensive arsenals. Each of our hero characters has a unique strength that will help you tactically in the game if you pay attention.

       

      Bottom Line, why must someone play this game?

      You must play it to experience what people are calling "The Grossest Game of the Year.” And if you knew GPK from the ’80s, it’s a fun trip down memory lane.

       

      How do you want this game to be remembered?

      I'd like this game to be remembered as us giving the Garbage Pail Kids the 8-bit game they have always deserved. The brand was so iconic and important, so them not having a game back in the late '80s was a travesty.

       

      What's next?

      Right now we are continuing to market Garbage Pail Kids: Mad Mike and the Quest for Stale Gum and our other games, Haunted: Halloween '86, Haunted: Halloween '85, and our newest open-world, mystery-adventure called Full Quiet. In addition to creating our own IP, we’re also entertaining ideas to bring existing IP to life in retro form, especially for others who never got their moment in the 8-bit sun.

      We love retro and remain committed to that space with whatever we do which includes the publishing venture 8-Bit Legit, consisting of Retrotainment Games and our partner Mega Cat Studios. In 8-Bit Legit, we take games from cartridge to console.

       

      Anything else you'd like to add?

      It's all about 8-bit. It's what we do at Retrotainment. The cartridge comes first. We also think it's cool to expand the NES catalog with games that have been passed over back in the day. Keep an eye out for what goofy game we can cook up next in our 8-bit laboratories. And as always, shout out to the NES homebrew community for making all this possible. We love being a part of such a vibrant, passionate, growing community!

       

      Check out the launch trailer here!

       

      Tim Hartman

      Producer at Retrotainment Games