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      Game Development

      Juicy Fog in Unity: A Mini Case Study

      Juicy Fog in Unity: A Mini Case Study

       

       

      Usually, I achieve fog by layering a decent amount of some low opacity fog sprites which are somewhat randomly scaled and rotated. The move slowly in random directions, and slowly change in scale and opacity over time.

      You can change the feel of the fog by changing the fog sprite assets themselves to be softer or harder-edged (or more/less detail) and by tuning the balance between the opacity of the fog particles and quantity. The more opaque they are, the less you need (lower emission rate), and the more "chunky" the fog will appear as a result. Less opaque fogs particles and more of them results in a more even distribution of fogginess (more smooth, less chunky).

       

      Here's an example fog particle system made that way:

       

       

      That's using this asset:

       

       

      And here's a variant using a softer fog asset:

       

       

      That used this asset:

      SpriteParticleCloudWhiteSoft.psd

       

      Here are the particle system settings I used there. Chances are, many of the settings will need to be substantially changed to fit the use case, but it can give you an idea. It's important to set the max particle size to something huge like 999, otherwise, unity may automatically scale the particle size based upon how big they are on camera. The max particle size there is really the "maximum size of particle in screen space at runtime".

       

       

       

       

       

      If it's low like at 0.5, it means their maximum size when rendered on screen would be 0.5, regardless of size settings elsewhere in the system. Important optimization and implementation related detail:
      There are two ways you can add a fog system like this to an area.
      1. Make it simulate in world space, and make its object a child of the camera object which moves around
      2. Make each simulate in local space (allowing them to be off-screen culled, unlike world space simulation) and make them a child of the level object. You define the areas they cover using the 'Shape' section of the particle system and adjust the emission rate to account for the amount of area covered

       

      You can set the simulation space in the particle system's main section, by gravity.

       

      With option 1, the particles will not move relative to the camera as the camera moves due to being in world space simulation, but the particles will spawn relative to the camera's position, which means the fog is essentially generated as the camera moves around, and the particles made where they camera used to be naturally go away. This works well with slowly moving cameras, because a low fog emission rate can easily keep up with the camera's slow position changing.

      It is also good if you're fine with the whole visible area being subject to fog in the same way visually (e.g, there's no place you don't want fog to be).

      This approach saves you the need from having to manually place and tune fog particle systems for the entire area, while still being decently efficient since it's one system moving with the camera, emitting a small amount of particles. You want to go with option 2 if you want to carefully control where the fog is, for example, if you never want it to display on top of a particular area such as a building or body of water. In DTs view angle, it may give more of a sense of depth to actually not have building rooftops occluded by fog, because it gives the sense that the roof tops are above the fog which is low to the ground.

      The main downside for 2 is that you have to manually place the particle systems and tune them by hand appropriately based upon amount of area covered. This is not so much a problem if the amount of space you have to deal with is small.

      You want to go with option 2 if you want to carefully control where the fog is, for example, if you never want it to display ontop of a particular area such as a building or body of water. In DTs view angle, it may give more of a sense of depth to actually not have building rooftops occluded by fog, because it gives the sense that the roof tops are above the fog which is low to the ground.

      The main downside for 2 is that you have to manually place the particle systems and tune them by hand appropriately based upon amount of area covered. This is not so much a problem if the amount of space you have to deal with is small.

      TLDR;
      Option 1 is good if you have a lot of content and little time to add fog to it, or you're fine with fog being everywhere on-screen.

      Option 2 is good if you want a lot of control over where the fog is and isn't, and is best if there's not that much content to treat this way. I think DT will look best with this option

      Twitch: How to stream Nintendo Switch

      Twitch: How to stream Nintendo Switch

       

       

      Got the vibe to stream the new Animal Crossing, or just about any other new Nintendo title? This is the guide that will teach you how to stream games from your Nintendo Switch!

      Although most of the latest generation of games consoles allow you to stream directly from an app on the console to Twitch, one of the more conventional methods of capturing game footage – whether for streaming or for video making purposes on YouTube – has been accomplished by using a capture card.

      Since the Nintendo Switch does not offer the ability to stream directly from the console, in order to share your gameplay you may need to invest in a capture card.

       

       


       

       

      Nintendo Switch Capture Cards

      You can find cheaper capture cards out there but these two are the gold standard of capture cards and are widely popular within the streaming community of Twitch as they operate on both Windows and Mac.

       

      Elgato Game Capture HD60

       

      Elgato Game Capture HD60 S

       

       


       

       

      Use the following steps to set up stuff, once you have invested in a capture card.

      How to use an Elgato HD60 / HD60 S
      capture card to stream
      your Nintendo Switch to Twitch

       

       

      1. Download the Elgato Game Capture software

      Either go to the Elgato website by yourself or click here to find the latest update for Windows of Game Capture.

       

      2. Dock your Nintendo Switch

      Since the capture card needs an HDMI port, in its base station you will have to dock your switch.

       

      3. Connect your capture card to your Nintendo Switch

      You have to plug your first HDMI cable into the docked Nintendo Switch HDMI-out port and plug the other end of the cable into the HDMI-in port on your capture card.

       

      4. Connect your capture card to your screen

      Now, go ahead and plug your second HDMI cable into the HDMI-out port on your capture card and connect the other end into the HDMI-in port of your TV/PC monitor.

       

      5. Connect your capture card to your PC

      Plug the USB into your computer and the other end into the capture card using the USB-C cable included with the Elgato capture card.

       

      6. Power up your Nintendo Switch, open Game Capture and OBS

      Set your OBS to window capture the gameplay once you've opened these, and you're ready to go live! It is worth double checking all your settings beforehand, as some of the defaults may not be suitable for setting up your stream to your specific needs.

       

       


       

       

      Having trouble with any of the Elgato capture products? For you to resolve them, they provided a ton of support pages to help you! Click here to check it out if you're struggling.

       

       


       

      Can you stream Nintendo Switch
      without a capture card?

      Nintendo Switch footage can be streamed without a capture card, but it does have other requirements of a comparable cost, in which case you are better off purchasing a capture card unless you already have the gear available.

      You can use the Xbox One to stream your gameplay to your Computer, which can then be window captured in OBS, according to reddit user u/kakysha. A link to his tutorial is here.

       

       


       

       

      There you have it! Your Nintendo Switch games can now be streamed to Twitch. If you are a console streamer, and this is your first streaming from a PC, you can be struggling to read your Twitch chat if you have only one computer screen. Have fun streaming your gameplays in your Nintendo Switch!

       

       

      Steam Controller Configuration

      Steam Controller Configuration

       

       

      How do I enable Steam Controller Configuration?

      1. Open the Steam application, and click the Steam in the menu tab.





      2. Once you've clicked Steam, select Settings.





      3. In the pop-up box, click Controller.





      4. Once you've clicked the Controller, select General Controller Settings below the Controller Configuration.





      5. Place a checkmark in the box for your controller type.





      6. In the upper right-hand corner, open Big Picture Mode by clicking the icon.





      7. Once it's open, click the Library button.





      8. Select Bite the Bullet.





      9. Select Manage Game.





      10. Click the Controller Configuration.





      11. Click the Browse Configs button.





      12. Select the available standard controls config in the Recommended section.





      13. Click the Apply Configuration button.



       


       

       

      How do I disable Steam Controller Configuration?

      1. At the upper right corner of Steam, click on the Big Picture Mode button.
        This will open Steam Big Picture Mode, in full screen.





      2. Click on the Library button.





      3. Select Bite the Bullet.





      4. In the left-hand column, click on the Manage Game button.




      5. Click the Controller Options button.





      6. Click the Steam Input Per-Game drop-down box.





      7. Select Forced Off.





      8. Launch Bite the Bullet to confirm that your controller is recognized.
        Note: If your input is still not being recognized, you may need to relaunch Bite the Bullet.


       

      Setting up a Charity Live Stream using Tiltify on Twitch, Facebook or Youtube

      Setting up a Charity Live Stream using Tiltify on Twitch, Facebook or Youtube

      1. Create or sign in to your Tiltify account: https://tiltify.com/
      You can also use the Feeding America Tiltify URL:
      https://tiltify.com/feedingamerica/bite-the-bullet-1/start/type

       

      OR

       


       

      2. Click "Get Started," and search for the charity you want to support.
      You can register for Feeding America directly at:
      https://tiltify.com/feedingamerica/bite-the-bullet-1

       

       

      OR

       


       

      3. The platform lets you choose to support an event already happening for your selected charity, or it lets you register as an individual and support your charity directly.

       

      OR

       


       

      4. Enter the requested information.

       

       


       

      5. Click "Create Campaign" then "Publish Campaign"!
      (Before publishing, you may have to confirm your account via your email.)

       

      THEN

       


       

      6. In your Campaign's Dashboard, there are links where you can copy your Campaign URL for sharing and your Donate URL to put the donate button onto your Twitch page.

       

       


       

      7. Stream your game on a site like Twitch, YouTube, or Facebook.

       

       

       


       

      8. Share with your followers and on social media.

       

       


       

      9. RAISE FUNDS FOR YOUR CHARITY!

       

      Bite The Bullet Twitch Assets

      Bite The Bullet Twitch Assets

       

      Some of the most important aspects of being a streamer is creating the channel page. Your channel page is where you can put your informations about you and your stream for your viewers to see.

       

      Click the button below to download the Bite The Bullet Twitch Asset!

      Use the table below as reference to the proper sizing of graphic that you can use on your Twitch channel.

       

      OPTIMIZE YOUR FILE SIZE

      Twitch is pretty flexible when it comes to the file size of images that you can upload and use for your page. In general, we’re working with a 10 MB size limit. If you’re over the limit, and haven’t quested your way to higher graphics editing XP, use a tool like EZ Gif or Tiny PNG with lossless compression.

       

      TO GIF, OR NOT TO GIF

      This is entirely up to the individual. As a general rule of thumb, you don’t need to GIF hard in most cases. GIFs are great for animations like emotes. For general customization on your Twitch graphics, you will want to stick to PNG or JPG. PNG files are perfect for cases where you need to maintain transparency in the background. There are significant file size differences for both, and JPG offers better compression and smaller overall files.

       

      LET’S MAKE SOME TWITCH GRAPHICS

      The world is your oyster, and you have infinite options when it comes to your graphics.

      If you’re not a Photoshop pro, stroll over and download GIMP for digital design. If GIMP isn’t doing it for you, simple apps like Placeit get the job done fast and with great results. It’s the perfect option for the graphics novice, and a streamer beginner that doesn’t yet have a fully distilled brand style guide to work from.

      Take a template and tweak until your heart is content. Save it, upload it to Twitch, and you’re in business!

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH PROFILE BANNER (COVER PHOTO)

       

       

      The Twitch Profile Banner is the first thing visitors and fans will see when they visit your Twitch profile. Let’s make a great first impression.

      • 1600 x 480 pixels image size
      • Less than 10MB file size
      • PNG, JPG, or GIF image type.

       

      UPLOADING YOUR TWITCH BANNER ON CHANNEL:

      1. On the top right-hand side of your screen, click on your avatar, then choose "Channel" from the drop-down menu.
      2. On the top left-hand side of your screen, click on your avatar by your name to show your banner.
      3. Hover over the banner, then click “Update Profile Banner”.
      4. Choose the file you want to upload as your banner from your computer. Your banner will upload and be resized to fit the space (if it is the wrong dimensions).

       

      UPLOADING YOUR TWITCH BANNER FROM CREATOR DASHBOARD:

      1. On the top right-hand side of your screen, click on your avatar, then choose "Creator Dashboard" from the drop-down menu.
      2. Click your avatar again (the options will have changed) and choose “Settings”.
      3. Find the profile banner section and click the “Update” button.
      4. A box will appear that says “Upload a Photo”.
      5. Choose the file you want to upload as your banner from your computer. Your banner will upload and be resized to fit the space (if it is the wrong dimensions).

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH OFFLINE BANNER

       

       

      This is the graphic that shows when your channel is offline. This is a 16:9 resolution that your monitor is most likely using right now, as well as the current generation HD standard. To my retro friends: I know you love and live the 4:3 life!

      For this banner, you will need:

      • 1920 x 1080 image size
      • Less than 10MB file size
      • PNG, JPG, or GIF image type.

       

      SETTING AN OFFLINE BANNER:

      1. Select "Choose a Video" under the Channel Trailer heading.
      2. Review the onboarding tips then dismiss the welcome message.
      3. If you need to upload a trailer: At the top of the setup page, select Video Producer.
      4. Click "Upload" and select the video to upload from your computer.
      5. Once the upload is complete, click the three dots menu of the upload you wish to set as a trailer, review it and the trailer title and then select "Set as Trailer" and you're done!
      6. If you already have an uploaded trailer: Select the video from your library. Review it and the trailer title and then select "Set as Channel Trailer" and you're done!

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH THUMBNAIL

       

      UPLOADING A THUMBNAIL:

      1. Go to your Video Manager.
      2. On any past broadcast or highlight, click Edit.
      3. Under the Upload Custom Thumb section, select Choose File.
      4. Choose your desired image. Image must be 16:9 (minimum size 1280 x 720).
      5. Click Upload.
      • Recommended Size: 1280 x 720 pixels
      • Maximum File Size: 10MB
      • Accepted File Types: JPEG, PNG, & GIF

       


       

      BITE THEBULLET TWITCH WEBCAM (OVERLAYS)

       

       

      • Recommended Size: 1920 x 1080 pixels
      • Maximum File Size: 40MB (Variable)
      • Accepted File Types: PNG (Static) & GIF (Animated)

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH CUSTOM EMOTES

       

       

      We love custom emotes. You love custom emotes. Let’s make custom emotes!

      You will need three sizes: 28 x 28, 56 x 56, and 112 x 112 pixels. Ideally, all three versions of every emote will be used here. Each will have to be in the PNG format and under 25KB.

      • Three file sizes (28 x 28, 56 x 56, and 112 x 112 pixels)
      • PNG file type
      • Under 25KB file size

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH PROFILE PICTURE (LOGO)

       

       

      The logo, profile picture, or avatar is the most prominent graphic for your Twitch page.

      • 256x256 file size
      • PNG or JPG file type

       

      UPLOAD PROFILE PHOTO THROUGH THE WEBSITE:

      1. Go to twitch.tv and log into your account, and then click your profile icon in the top-right corner of the screen.
      2. Click your current profile photo again to be taken to your settings.
      3. Under the "Profile" section of your account settings, click "Update Profile Picture".
      4. Select "Upload Photo" (or "Edit Current Thumbnail" if you want to simply re-crop your existing profile photo).
      5. Select the appropriate photo from your computer.
      6. Crop and rotate your profile photo as desired, then hit "Save".

       

      UPLOAD PROFILE PHOTO THROUGH THE MOBILE APP:

      1. Open the Twitch app on your iPhone or Android device, and from any page, tap your profile picture in the top-left corner.
      2. Your profile will be shown then in the top-right corner, tap the Gear Icon and then select "Settings".
      3. A menu will appear then tap the first option, "Account".
      4. Tap "Edit Profile".
      5. Tap "Select Image" on the page that appears. You'll then be able to either take a photo, or choose a photo from your device's camera roll.
      6. Once you've selected and cropped the photo, tap "Save" in the top-left corner.

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH SUB BADGE

       

       

      Sub badges appear next to Twitch users that have subbed to your channel. Like custom emotes you’ll need three sizes for each badge as well. They all have to be in the PNG format and under 25KB.

      • 25KB File Size
      • PNG file type
      • You must upload the image in three different sizes: 18px x 18px, 36px x 36px, and 72px x 72px.

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH PANELS

       

       

      Twitch panels appear under your beautiful Twitch stream. The maximum file size is 320 x 300, but any perfect square can work.

      Mega Cat recommends either a 320 x 160 or 320 x 100 file. This gives you something more rectangular and doesn’t push the content down as much. Panels are typically made for about, contact, donation, social media, hardware, rules, and subscription sections.

      • Less than 10MB file size
      • PNG file type

       

      TO CREATE OR EDIT A PANEL:

      1. Click the Edit Panels switch in the top left of your channel page underneath the video screen from OFF to ON.
      2. Edit the panel as you wish by inserting title, icon, embedded image link and description to the panel (where you can attach further links using Markdown code)
      3. To save the panel, click Submit.
      4. Click the + sign to add a new panel and a new panel will appear.
      5. To see your finished panel look, click the Edit Panels switch from ON to OFF to return to the regular channel page view.

       

      TO DELETE A PANEL:

      1. Click the Edit Panels switch in the top left of your channel page underneath the video screen from OFF to ON.
      2. To delete a panel, click Remove.
      3. To see your finished panel look, click the Edit Panels switch from ON to OFF to return to the regular channel page view.

       

      TO REARRANGE YOUR PANELS:

      1. Click the Edit Panels switch in the top left of your channel page underneath the video screen from OFF to ON.
      2. The movement cursor icon will only appear if you hover over the panel you wish to move.
      3. Click on the panel and drag it in the panel arrangement to your preferred position.
      4. Hold left-click to release the panel to your desired location.
      5. To see your finished panel look, click the Edit Panels switch from ON to OFF to return to the regular channel page view.

       


       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH ALERTS

       

       

      SETTING UP YOUR TWITCH ALERTS:

      1. Go to StreamLabs and log in with your Twitch account.
      2. Once logged into the StreamLabs with your Twitch account, click on Alert Box from the left menu.
      3. At the top of the screen, you will see five default alert names with checkboxes beside them. Uncheck those you don't want to use. Keep the ones checked that you want.
      4. At the bottom of the screen will be some General Settings for your alerts such as a time delay and basic layout. Create the adjustments you need, then press Save Settings.
      5. Tabs for the individual alerts are placed next to General Settings. Click on the tabs to customize each alert with the image and sound you want to use.
      6. Once all of your customizations have been made, click Save Settings and click on the Click to Show Widget URL box at the top of the screen. Highlight this URL by double-clicking on it with your mouse and then copy it to your clipboard by right-clicking on it and selecting Copy.

       

      • Recommended Size: 750 x 250 pixels
      • Maximum File Size: 10MB
      • Accepted File Types: PNG (Static) & GIF / WEBM (Animated)

       


       

       

      BITE THE BULLET TWITCH PARTNER CHEERMOTE

       

       

      After you’ve become a partner with Twitch you unlock some very cool customization perks. The most exciting to many Twitch fans are the Cheermotes on your channel. You can set 5 unique cheermotes depending on each tier of Bits 1, 100, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000. In simple mode you just need to upload the 112 x 112 size of your cheermote. In advanced mode you can upload in 5 different sizes: 28 x 28, 42 x 42, 56 x 56, 84 x 84, and 112 x 112.

      In most cases, simple mode will do just fine. The advanced mode is most useful when a cheermote looks best at higher resolutions, and is harder to distinguish at smaller resolutions.